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Re-drawing the Map: The Lost Dark-Age Kingdom of Rheged

COVER IMAGE: DGNHAS/GUARD ARCHAEOLOGY LTD This week has seen the announcement that archaeological research at a site in Galloway has suggested it may have been at the heart of a “lost kingdom” from the Dark Ages. Trusty’s Hill is an early medieval fort at Gatehouse of Fleet, Dumfries and Galloway. The hillfort comprises a fortified citadel…

The Home Front in Britain 1914-1918: Current Archaeology Award 2017 Nominee

We are delighted to announce that The Home Front in Britain 1914-1918, edited by Wayne D. Cocroft, John Schofield and Catrina Appleby, published by Council for British Archaeology, has been nominated in the ‘Book of the Year’ category in the 2017 Current Archaeology Awards! Take a look below to read about the book, see what people…

OXBOW BOOKS IN-STORE SALE

OUR LAST EVER IN-STORE SALE… We’re sad to see our Oxford showroom go, but there’s still one last chance to visit us, and pick up a bargain while you’re here… We’ll be open 8th – 18th November Weekdays: 9am – 5pm Saturday 10th: 9am-5pm Sunday 11th: closed 10 Hythe Bridge St., Oxford, OX1 2EW Please…

Storms, War and Shipwrecks at the Ashmolean : A Feast for all Senses

 Last week I had the pleasure of visiting the Ashmolean Museum’s latest exhibition: Storms, War & Shipwrecks. With such a powerful title I was expecting great things. I was not disappointed. Storms, War and Shipwrecks: Treasures from the Sicilian Seas tells the incredible story of this Mediterranean island through finds rescued from the sea by…

Oxbow Books and Distributed Publishers in the media

Over the past couple of months Oxbow Books and other distributed publishers such as MOLA, have received great reviews in the British media. Three Oxbow authors have written fascinating features for History Extra and The Independent online have written an article on the archaeological research carried out by MOLA, on how London became Britain’s capital. For…

Trailblazing Women From Medieval History

By Susan Signe Morrison “Though I treated him worst, I loved him best.” These are the last known words of an eleventh-century Icelandic woman, Gudrun Osvifsdottir. Married four times, Gudrun helped plan her true love’s murder, only to later become Iceland’s first nun and anchoress, a hermit who lived alone in a cell. This seductive…

Current Archaeology Live 2016

Last weekend Oxbow Books had the pleasure of attending Current Archaeology Live 2016. Hosted by the magazine of the same name, this conference is attended by many archaeologists, from the hobbyist to the most respected experts. The two days are filled with lectures on the latest finds and ground-breaking research given by leading experts, an…

Discovering Britain’s Home Front 1914-18

Between 1914 and 1918 Britain’s cities, towns, villages and countryside were transformed by war.  For the first time in generations her population was directly threatened by conflict.  Coastal towns were bombarded by German warships and submarines, while airships and aircraft brought death and destruction from above.  Across the country thousands of factories were turned over…

Doug Kennedy photographing his way through the North Downs Landscapes

I was brought up in Barnes, in south-west London, and if I went to the countryside for the day, or a weekend camping with the boy scouts, the destination would be somewhere in the North Downs, usually near Dorking or Guildford. Later on it was orienteering in forests, anywhere from the Hogs Back to Sevenoaks…

An Author and a Gardener: World War One – a prelude to a friendship

Author Alan Ruff talks here about the parts played by Edith Wharton and Lawrence Johnston in the First World War, and how the events of the war shaped their lives and drew each in time towards the solace of the garden. Edith Wharton and Lawrence Johnston were two very different people who shared a passion…