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Herding Anglo-Saxon Cats

WRITTEN BY GUEST-BLOGGER AND AUTHOR GALE OWEN-CROCKER Many of the books published by Oxbow Books are edited volumes or collections of contributions from various authors. These collections – often from conference proceedings or academic lectures – allow a theme to be explored through various different perspectives, and using different disciplines, methodologies, or evidence. But how…

A Tunnel Through Time: ‘Tunnel’ at Museum of London Docklands

The Crossrail project is the biggest construction project in Europe and is one of the largest single infrastructure investments ever undertaken in the UK. Since the construction of the new railway began in 2009, over 15,000 men and women have worked on the project and over 100 million working hours have been completed. It’s a…

Seats of Power in Europe: From the Charmless to the Captivating

WRITTEN BY ANTHONY EMERY, AUTHOR AND GUEST BLOGGER Throughout Europe, castles, forts, palaces and houses remain sites of interest, whether they are now fully furnished museums or mostly ruined. There’s something intriguing to us about a place that once used to be such a focal point in a landscape, and from which so much of…

Trisha Brown: In Memoriam

Written by guest blogger Ciara Caya It was with great sorrow that we learned on March 18th that the internationally celebrated choreographer, dancer, and artist, Trisha Brown, passed away at the age of 80; Brown had been battling vascular dementia since 2011. In this time after her passing it is only fitting that we celebrate the…

Murder, Money and Academic Mayhem: the power of the archaeological hoax

Written by guest blogger Alice Parkin From practical jokes to proving the existence of Jesus Christ himself, archaeological forgeries and fakes come in all shapes and sizes; and a well-timed hoax can make fortunes, ruin reputations, and send academics off in the wrong direction for decades. Often, archaeological hoaxes are accepted because the information they…

Alexander the Great by Numbers

How many cities did Alexander name after himself? How about his horse? How big was his army, and how far did his armies march to conquer it? We answer these and other questions for you below! COVER IMAGE: ALEXANDER FOUNDING ALEXANDRIA, PLACIDO COSTANZI

Secrets of Life in Tudor London

CROSSRAIL EXCAVATIONS AT CHARTERHOUSE COVER IMAGE: CROSSRAIL © Since Crossrail began construction in 2009, huge swathes of London’s hidden past have been uncovered. More than 200 archaeologists have unearthed over 10,000 objects from 40 locations, spanning a staggering 55 million years. In 2013, MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) began excavations at the Crossrail site in Farringdon,…

International Women’s Day: Spotlight

From the sweeping study of gender in antiquity to the biographies of individual women, we’ve got hundreds of books that we could showcase for International Women’s Day. Instead, we’ve hand-picked a selection that are interesting, informative, and educational in different ways, and which we hope might get you thinking. 1. WOMEN IN HISTORY   A Medieval Woman’s…

Yorkshire Light: A Photographer’s Perspective

  BY GUEST WRITER, AUTHOR AND PHOTOGRAPHER DOUG KENNEDY Cover image ©  Doug Kennedy I have now produced photo books of the Chiltern Hills, the North Downs which stretch from West Surrey to the Kent coast at Dover, Norfolk, and Yorkshire so have covered much of the south-east, east and north of England. Images in these…

PATRIOT’S DAY: BOSTON STRONG

On April 15th, 2013, near the finish line of the Boston Marathon, two homemade bombs detonated twelve seconds apart, killing three, injuring hundreds, and leading to a four-day manhunt for the two brothers responsible, resulting in the death of one and the capture of the other. Nearly four years after the devastating attack, Patriot’s Day…